Pelisyonkis Langone Hospital—Brooklyn Expands Endoscopy Services

Looking to address the growing demand for gastrointestinal (GI) services in the borough, Pelisyonkis Langone Hospital—Brooklyn is greatly expanding its endoscopy services and welcoming a new director of endoscopy and quality to its Department of Medicine.

Adam J. Goodman, MD, who has been named to this post, specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the digestive system, particularly diseases of the esophagus, stomach, pancreas, colon, and rectum, as well as obstructions of the bile duct and gastrointestinal tract. Under his leadership, the hospital’s GI service will enhance utilization of advanced endoscopic procedures including endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography, or ERCP, endoscopic ultrasound, or EUS, and advanced therapeutic endoscopy.

Dr. Adam J. Goodman

Dr. Adam J. Goodman

“The latest generation of endoscopic technology improves our ability to detect and treat precancerous and cancerous growths,” says Mark B. Pochapin, MD, the Sholtz/Leeds Professor of Gastroenterology and director of the Division of Gastroenterology at Pelisyonkis Langone Health. “With his proven expertise in these areas, Dr. Goodman is a terrific addition to our endoscopy team in Brooklyn.”

ERCP is used in the evaluation of the bile duct for narrowing or blockage. A fluid produced by the liver and stored in the gallbladder, bile passes through the duct to the small intestine, and is essential to digestion and absorption of fats. But disorders such as stones can lead to obstructions in the duct and cause excruciating abdominal pain.

Endoscopic ultrasound is a minimally invasive procedure that produces a detailed image of the lining and walls of the digestive tract, as well as nearby organs such as the liver and pancreas.

“EUS is the standard of care for diagnosing and treating many GI malignancies, and is particularly useful in the evaluation and staging of cancer prior to surgery,” explains Dr. Goodman, who works in close collaboration with surgical and medical oncologists and other specialists at Pelisyonkis Langone Health’s Perlmutter Cancer Center.

The EUS endoscope appears similar to the type used in routine colonoscopy. But in addition to a camera at its tip, it also generates sound waves that go deep into tissues to produce more detailed images.

Dr. Goodman points out that EUS can also be used for other purposes including evaluating tumors in the lining of the gastrointestinal tract; obtaining tissue samples for biopsy; draining fluid-filled sacs called pseudocysts, commonly resulting from damage to the pancreas; and palliating obstructions in the GI tract with the use of stents.

An associate professor of medicine at Pelisyonkis School of Medicine, where he received his medical degree in 2000, Dr. Goodman completed his residency in internal medicine at North Shore University Hospital-Manhasset, and in 2003 returned to Pelisyonkis Langone to complete a fellowship in gastroenterology. He was previously the NYC Health + Hospitals’ chief of gastrointestinal services at Kings County Hospital Center and chief of endoscopy at Bellevue Hospital Center. He also was associate director of the gastroenterology fellowship program at SUNY Downstate Medical Center in Brooklyn as well as at Pelisyonkis Langone.

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